About Seaton Valley Online

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About Seaton Valley Community Partnership

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About Seaton Valley

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Holywell

Holywell Village is in the south east of Seaton Valley and boarders with North Tyneside. The village sits above a Dene that has a small river, Seaton Burn, running through as it makes its way down to the sea. The Dene is a deep sided ancient semi-natural woodland that stretches from Seghill in the west, passing close to Holywell and on to Seaton Sluice and the coast to the east.

The village takes its name from a well in the dene that is only a short walk from the village centre. The well was once used as a medical spring but is not used for this purpose now. It was formally known as Our Lady’s Well, and therefore supposed to be holy, and hence where the village got its name.

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New Hartley

New Hartley is a small village in South East Northumberland, within Seaton Valley, adjacent to Hartley, Seaton Delaval and Seaton Sluice. The village is just off the A190 road about 6 miles (9.7 km) north of Tynemouth and 4 miles (6.4 km) south of Blyth.
The village is historically linked to nearby Hartley village, which was originally an Anglo-Saxon settlement A number of pits were created and exhausted at Hartley, before a new pit called Hester was sunk in 1845 at a site in between Seaton Sluice and Seaton Delaval. Soon after, families settled around the new mine, and the village of New Hartley was created.
To the north and west of the pit, in a rough L shape, were built houses, a Methodist chapel, the "Hartley Hastings Arms" and New Hartley Workmen's Club.
The village has since expanded and is now home to a population in excess of 2000. A small parade of shops and Post Office is in the centre of the village together with the Memorial Hall to provide a focus for village activities.

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Seaton Delaval

Seaton Delaval sits in the centre of Seaton Valley and is the largest of the five villages.

The village is located at the head of The Avenue, a tree lined road that runs from Delaval Hall. The Hall is a Grade 1 listed Country House that was designed by Sir John Vanbrugh in 1718 for Admiral George Delaval; it is now owned by the National Trust.

The name ‘Seaton Delaval’ means Sea Town, due to the proximity to the North Sea east of the village. The lands surrounding Delaval Hall were owned by the Delaval Family and the village takes its name from the family that made such an impact in the area.

The village has a number of local shops, a High School, Middle and a First School and a large park located close to the village centre.

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Seaton Sluice

Today, Seaton Sluice is a quiet resort with a very rural geography. It shows no signs of its industrial past, the bottle works and all coalmining having long since disappeared. The Seaton Burn trickles into the harbour where small fishing boats are moored.

It is still however well supplied with pubs and eating places,( Delaval Arms, Waterford Arms, Melton Constable, Kings Arms, Astley Arms and the Chippy!), walks inland and coastal, with a lovely beach to comb and swim from, weather permitting. Its beautiful shoreline and beach, only rivalled by the wonderful countryside all around, makes it a good place to live and to visit.

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Seghill

Seghill is a former mining village, the most westerly of Seaton Valley. Its approximately 15 miles North East of Newcastle and 3 miles from the coast at Seaton Sluice. At the last census there was 2927 people registered.
It has a Pub, Club, Rugby Club, Football clubs, First School, Church and Methodist chapel and a small selection of shops. It is connected to Newcastle and Blyth by bus and also Whitley Bay and Cramlington. The main road is the A190 and the former Blyth and Tyne railway runs through the village.

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Events

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Events for January 2019

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Calendar of Events

Calendar of Events
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Planning Sub-Committee Meeting – 14th January 2019 at 6:30 pm

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Hartley Pit Disaster Presentation – 29 January 2019

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Light Lunch – 30 January 2019

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